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The project DICE: linking climate change and extreme events with inequality

"We are seeing an increase in the intensity of extreme climate events, as well as growing inequality.  There is an urgency to look at the intersections between climate change and parameters such as class, gender, ethnicity and soco-economic background", says Director Emily Boyd.
Fire in forest

She is leading the four yearlong project, Recasting the disproportionate impacts of climate change extremes, DICE. It looks specifically at the area of noneconomic loss and damage (L&D) caused by climate change and who it affects, how and why and at what scale.

– With the ambition to follow up on the Paris Agreement, and countries’ pledge to meet the SDG:s, we need to push research on loss and damage forward. To do that we need to first conceptualize loss and damage: how is it understood today and how does it relate to adaptation?

DICE will develop a global network of cases on loss and damage, as well as looking in depth at number of case studies in various places around the world.

– You need to look at both developing and developed countries since the changing nature of the climate problems mean that countries all over the world are now feeling the effects. How are different vulnerable communities reacting to extreme events, and what are emerging efforts to avert, minimize and address loss and damage, and from whom?

The ambition of DICE is to build capacity for the climate change research community to engage with research on loss and damage, and transformational challenges, specifically by delivering insights into the potential governance instruments for national engagement and how it differs from adaptation.

– By engaging with the research, and by highlighting human stories and experiences, we want to advance climate governance and actions for sustainable transformation, at all levels of society, she concludes.

About L&D, Loss and damage

Loss and Damage has been established under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in addition to adaptation and mitigation to address the impacts of both sudden and slow-onset events relating to climate change, including harm to people and ecosystems caused by floods, hurricanes, sea level rise and desertification in developed and developing countries alike.

Read more about Recasting the disproportionate impacts of climate change extremes, DICE.

The project is supported by the Swedish funding agency Formas.

 

Related: Conference on Loss and Damage 2019

In October Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies is organising a Conference on Loss and Damage 2019. 

The conference will explore L&D through five analytical lenses.

  • Defining L&D from a climate change perspective – what do we know?
  • Defining L&D from an ecological perspective – what do we know?
  • Defining L&D from a sustainability perspective – what do we know?
  • Governance and economics of L&D – how do we do it?
  • Policy and practice of L&D on social-ecological systems – how do we do it?

Read more about the conference at LUCSUS web page.

Climate Change & Resilience

This research falls under LUCSUS' research theme Climate Change & Resilience. 

About the Researcher

Emily Boyd

Emily Boyd is Director of Lund University Centre for Sustainaibility Studies and Professor in Sustainability Science. She is a leading social scientist with a background in international development, environment and climate change, with focus on the interdisciplinary nexus of poverty, livelihoods and resilience in relation to global environmental change.

Emily Boyd's staff page.

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