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What can wine tell us about the future of life on earth?

Photo: Mostphoto.
Lecture
Readership (docent) lecture in environmental science by Dr. Kimberley Nicholas.

Enthusiasts appreciate the “goût de terroir,” or taste of place, that reflects the unique conditions of both where and how wine is grown. This sensitivity has made wine a useful indicator of climate history, with harvest records used to reconstruct climate back nearly seven centuries. More recently, wine has become an important emblem of climate change, as wine regions struggle to produce traditional varieties and flavors in a world where climate change is redrawing the map. In this way, wine represents the half of wild plants and animals studied, who have already moved in space (range) or time (phenology) in response to climate change. 

Wine also illustrates other important dynamics of climate change. The changes observed to wine composition and production highlight the urgent need to stabilize the climate within a range where ecosystems and societies can function well, and offers troubling insights into the challenges of feeding the world on a warming planet. Like many crops, only a few varieties of wine make up the majority of the global market; this homogenization and globalization makes the food system more vulnerable to the changing climate. The untapped potential to harness biodiversity within wine could offer substantial climate adaptation potential, but there are limits to adaptation, beyond which loss of traditional livelihoods, economies, and ways of life create existential questions about how to carry on and remake cherished values in a climate-changed world.

Pre-registration required: https://forms.gle/rLj7VuqYMxnUHXKj7

 

Kimberly Nicholas

Kimberly Nicholas is a Senior Lecturer in Sustainability Science at Lund University in Sweden. She studies how to manage natural resources to both support a good life today, and leave a living planet for future generations. In particular, her research focuses on sustainable farming systems, using nature-based solutions to benefit both people and ecosystems, and linking research with policy and practice to support a zero-emissions society that she hopes to live to see. She nearly became a consultant to the California wine industry instead. She holds a BSc and PhD from Stanford University and MSc degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of California-Davis.   https://www.lucsus.lu.se/kimberly-nicholas

 

Time: 
1 October 2020 13:00 to 14:00
Location: 
zoom
Contact: 
kimberly.nicholas [at] lucsus.lu.se

About the event

Time: 
1 October 2020 13:00 to 14:00
Location: 
zoom
Contact: 
kimberly.nicholas [at] lucsus.lu.se

LUCSUS
P.O. Box 170, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden
Phone: +46(0)46- 222 80 81
info [at] lucsus [dot] lu [dot] se