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Kimberly Nicholas

Kimberly Nicholas

Senior Lecturer, Docent, Director of Studies PhD school

Kimberly Nicholas

From Pinot to Xinomavro in the world's future wine-growing regions

Author

  • E. M. Wolkovich
  • I. García de Cortázar-Atauri
  • I. Morales-Castilla
  • K. A. Nicholas
  • T. Lacombe

Summary, in English

Predicted impacts of climate change on crops—including yield declines and loss of conservation lands—could be mitigated by exploiting existing diversity within crops. Here we examine this possibility for wine grapes. Across 1,100 planted varieties, wine grapes possess tremendous diversity in traits that affect responses to climate, such as phenology and drought tolerance. Yet little of this diversity is exploited. Instead many countries plant 70–90% of total hectares with the same 12 varieties—representing 1% of total diversity. We outline these challenges, and highlight how altered planting practices and new initiatives could help the industry better adapt to continued climate change.

Department/s

  • LUCSUS (Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies)
  • BECC - Biodiversity and Ecosystem services in a Changing Climate

Publishing year

2018-01-02

Language

English

Pages

29-37

Publication/Series

Nature Climate Change

Volume

8

Issue

1

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Nature Research

Topic

  • Climate Research
  • Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use

Status

Published

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1758-678X