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Kimberly Nicholas

Kimberly Nicholas

Senior Lecturer, Docent, Director of Studies PhD school

Kimberly Nicholas

Phenological diversity provides opportunities for climate change adaptation in winegrapes

Author

  • E. M. Wolkovich
  • D. O. Burge
  • Marilyn A. Walker
  • K. A. Nicholas

Summary, in English

Climate change poses an unprecedented challenge to agriculture. While growers have always struggled with year-to-year variation in climate – early rains or unusually hot summers – climate change provides a major directional shift in mean climate. Across the globe, growing regions are warming and plants are shifting in both time and space. Current and future shifts pose a major challenge to researchers and growers alike, yet they also highlight a major avenue to adapt crops to climate change – by understanding and exploiting phenological diversity. Using winegrapes (Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera) as a case study, we review the phenological diversity present within one crop and its underlying environmental and genetic drivers. In winegrapes, harvest dates are strongly tied to temperature, but this sensitivity varies greatly, with different cultivars (or ‘varieties’) of grapes ripening much more or less for the same amount of warming. Synthesis. This phenological diversity provides a mechanism to help growers adapt winegrapes to shifting climates – by planting different varieties that will grow well under current and future climate regimes. More generally, understanding phenological diversity – including its environmental vs. genetic components – offers a major avenue to use ecological knowledge to advance adaptation for winegrapes, and many other crops, to climate change.

Department/s

  • LUCSUS (Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies)
  • BECC - Biodiversity and Ecosystem services in a Changing Climate

Publishing year

2017-07-01

Language

English

Pages

905-912

Publication/Series

Journal of Ecology

Volume

105

Issue

4

Document type

Journal article review

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Topic

  • Ecology

Keywords

  • common garden
  • crop
  • genotype × environment interaction
  • phenology
  • temperature response
  • Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera

Status

Published

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 0022-0477