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Science has much to offer social movements in the face of planetary emergencies

Climate demonstration in London. Photo: Pixabay.

Four LUCSUS researchers argue in an article in the journal Nature, Ecology & Evolution that the most important, powerful and unique contribution science can make to social movements is to share arduously accumulated knowledge about processes of social and political change.

 – We wrote this article because we saw a debate emerge around how researchers can and should contribute to stop climate change and other environmental problems. We have discussed this issue amongst ourselves and with colleagues for a long time. Now voices are starting to be heard that researchers should engage in climate activism. We are not against activism, but think it's important not to forget that as scientists, we have unique and important contributions to make with our knowledge. We can not only share facts about what is happening with the climate and ecosystems, but also knowledge of how society works and can be changed, says Ellinor Isgren, researcher at LUCSUS.

Read the article: Science has much to offer social movements in the face of planetary emergencies, Ellinor Isgren, Chad S. Boda, David Harnesk & David O’Byrne, in Nature.com